What Makes A Good Scary Movie?

A horror film is a movie in which the whole goal is to illicit feelings of shock, disgust, or terror from the audiences watching. It has been around ever since the eighteen hundreds and overlap, sometimes, with other genres as well. "Horror", as a term, can be used in order to describe different movies from ones that involve murderers to ones that are about ghosts. It is also often hard to gage what makes some scary movies scarier than others as well.

The very first scary movies were silent films about demons and cursed locations. In 1910, the first film version of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein was released and was extremely successful in scaring audiences across Europe and North America. The majority of the early full length horror movies were made and produced in Germany, who had, early on, effectively cornered the market. By the early thirties, filmmakers in America jumped into the game with works such as Dracula, Frankenstein, and Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde.

Different things will scare different types of people but the directors and producers of the early thirties and twenties discovered fairly quickly that suspense, sudden plot twists, eerie sound effects, and other factors were more effective at getting people frightened than scary monsters or bloody guts.

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INTERVIEW: Wes Craven’s horror fundamentals

Few horror filmmakers have taken the road of greater resistance to their calling than 71-year-old Wes Craven, who grew up a fundamentalist Baptist in the American Midwest. Craven has created two of film’s most popular horror franchises, Scream and Nightmare on Elm Street.

With Scream 4 opening April 15, the movies will soon pass $1-billion (U.S.) in global box office – shocking news for a Johns Hopkins grad who didn’t see a horror film until he was halfway through making his first.

READ INTERVIEW AT THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Creators of ‘Saw’ movies graduate to ‘Insidious’

The creators of 'Saw' are back with another horror movie as their popular franchise comes to a close. Since Halloween weekend in 2004, James Wan and Leigh Whannell have gleefully haunted moviegoers — and scared up impressive box-office numbers — beginning with the original Saw.

So what really gets their gooseflesh going? Watching an audience's reaction at one of their screenings.

"When I know a scene is coming up that's a big scare, my heart starts to beat really fast," Whannell says. "I start to get really nervous. It's pretty nuts."

READ MORE AT USA TODAY

Watch Action And Horror Movies Online Through Streaming

Today, it is easier than ever to catch up on the movies you have missed. There are new movies available in the theaters almost every week. Christmas and summer blockbusters give extra incentives to get out and catch a movie. New horror movies are being produced, redone and offered all the time. Because of modern technology, it is possible to stay inside your home and watch some of the best horror movies online just by searching the internet.

Online streaming is perfect for people who cannot get out of their homes for entertainment due to illness or injury. Laptops with wireless modems are used for this purpose by invalids around the world. Many people choose to watch their favorite television shows by streaming them on their computer.

Paying and watching for free are two of the ways that people have been streaming shows and movies to their computer. Both are methods that let the customer choose what they want to download and watch. There may be commercials but some programs do not come with commercials and pay sites usually offer most movies without them. Some movies are too recent to be able to download for viewing instantly. This usually just requires some patience, since movies become available after some time has passed.

Some allow anyone to upload streamed movies or video. Because of this fact, it may be necessary to view a portion of the desired film before downloading it. Many videos are uploaded with bad results, poor video quality or damaged sound. These websites also put the computer at risk of catching a virus from a program someone has uploaded.

Some websites are free, so anyone can search for and view the programs, videos and movies that are available. Other sites remain very popular but come with a monthly fee that is inexpensive and well worth it if you enjoy being able to watch movies online. The list of movies and television shows from these sites is usually broad and chances are good that the desired movie is there to watch. Some of the movies from this company are not available to watch instantly. Instant movies, however, are never out of stock. If the one you want to watch is offered, you can point and click and be watching immediately.

Parents should be aware of the availability of these shows and movies and keep a good watch on what their children are viewing. Very young children are knowledgeable in modern technology and can program a VCR before their parents, in some cases. Adventure, horror and cartoons are only a few of the things that people are putting online for everyone to see. Young people should be shielded from potentially damaging or scarring movies.

Since online streaming has become popular, physical stores are closing down. This means the chances of finding the desired movie online are greater than actually leaving to go to a store and find it.

Some of the more popular horror movies online, like the Nightmare on Elm Street franchise, are easy to find in their entirety. Even some of the oldest movies, like 1941s the Wolfman have become available to the public for instant viewing.

When searching online for the largest selection of scary movies be sure to visit Frightflicks.com - providing a massive selection of the best vampire movies, and zombie movies.

Rob Zombie To Resurrect Salem’s Witches In New Horror Movie

Heavy rocker Rob Zombie has signed on to direct another horror movie - with the team behind cult film Paranormal Activity.

The former White Zombie frontman will direct his own script in a film about the resurrection of the witches of Salem, Massachusetts, who were executed for sorcery 300 years ago.

Lords of Salem will be Zombie's fifth feature film as writer and director - his past successes have included The Devil’s Rejects and the Halloween remake.

He will team with Haunted Movies executives Jason Blum, Steven Schneider, and Oren Peli - the team behind 2009 box office phenomenon Paranormal Activity - for the project, which will be set in modern-day Salem.

“The Shining” tops list of scariest movies

Jigsaw, step aside. “The Shining” featuring Jack Nicholson as an axe-wielding psycho has topped a list of the scariest horror movies of all time.  With Halloween just days away, the writers at film website Totalscifionline.com compiled a list of the 100 greatest horror movies.

“Nearly 30 years after its initial release, The Shining remains an unparalled study in isolation, madness and paranoia,” said Matt McAllister, editor of Totalscifionline.com. “The expansive sets, surreal visuals, and an intense performance from Jack Nicholson add up to a film guaranteed to give viewers a sleepless night.”

READ ARTICLE AT REUTERS

Director John Landis recalls filming ‘An American Werewolf’ in London

Maggie Thatcher put a stake through the heart of the British film industry. When I was shooting An American Werewolf in London, Warren Beatty was shooting Reds here and there was also another little film in progress called Raiders of the Lost Ark. These were all made under a very useful tax-break agreement called the Eady Levy, which began the boom of Americans coming to make big pictures with largely British casts and crews in London in the 1960s. Turns out mine was one of the last Eady pictures made.

READ ARTICLE AT THE GUARDIAN UK

My £45 hit film: Marc Price on his zombie movie Colin

Marc Price's film wowed the critics at Cannes and has won a deal for nationwide release. Not bad, he tells Sarfraz Manzoor, considering he juggled making it with his job at a courier firm – and it cost only £45.

READ ARTICLE AT THE GUARDIAN UK

Drag Me to Hell: Sam Raimi’s Genre Curse

 

If there's one film magazine connected with the Cannes festival, it'd probably be Positif or Cahiers du Cinema, French journals whose passionate seriousness perfectly suits the movies that usually show here. This year, though, the festival's journal of record should be the American horror-movie mag Fangoria.

The official Cannes selection has included all manner of genre films: a sexy vampire shocker (the Korean Thirst), a guns-n-guts crime film (Vengeance, from Hong Kong) and two gory psycho-thrillers about devoted mothers gone bad (the Korean Mother and Lars von Trier'sAntichrist). Also, to stretch the point just a little, we've had three movies, in radically different tones (Pixar's Up, Pedro Almodovar'sBroken Embraces and Antichrist) about the stages of necrophilia — people coping not with the death of a loved one but with the love of a dead one. And this is only the eighth day of the 12-day bash. 

Now comes Drag Me to Hell — a great genre title if there ever was one — from Sam Raimi, who made zillions with his Spider-Man movies but is revered by horrorphiliacs for another trilogy, his cheapo-creepo Evil Dead movies. Taking a break from A-movie budgets, subjects and actors, Raimi and his brother Ivan concocted a script about the effects of a gypsy curse on a basically nice person who does One Bad Thing.

READ ARTICLE AT TIME

Drag Me to Hell: Sam Raimi’s Genre Curse

 

If there's one film magazine connected with the Cannes festival, it'd probably be Positif or Cahiers du Cinema, French journals whose passionate seriousness perfectly suits the movies that usually show here. This year, though, the festival's journal of record should be the American horror-movie mag Fangoria.

The official Cannes selection has included all manner of genre films: a sexy vampire shocker (the Korean Thirst), a guns-n-guts crime film (Vengeance, from Hong Kong) and two gory psycho-thrillers about devoted mothers gone bad (the Korean Mother and Lars von Trier'sAntichrist). Also, to stretch the point just a little, we've had three movies, in radically different tones (Pixar's Up, Pedro Almodovar'sBroken Embraces and Antichrist) about the stages of necrophilia — people coping not with the death of a loved one but with the love of a dead one. And this is only the eighth day of the 12-day bash. 

Now comes Drag Me to Hell — a great genre title if there ever was one — from Sam Raimi, who made zillions with his Spider-Man movies but is revered by horrorphiliacs for another trilogy, his cheapo-creepo Evil Dead movies. Taking a break from A-movie budgets, subjects and actors, Raimi and his brother Ivan concocted a script about the effects of a gypsy curse on a basically nice person who does One Bad Thing.

READ ARTICLE AT TIME


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