5 Reasons Why TV Shows Should Set an End Date

Over the weekend, Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan and AMC came to an agreement to keep the critically acclaimed show on the sometimes critically despised network for 16 final episodes. Setting an end date for Breaking Bad lets Gilligan and his writers craft the conclusion of Walter White's story exactly how they want, without the worry of contract negotiations and the fear of running out of ideas.

This isn't a new. In Britain, lots of shows have one or two seasons (see: The OfficeCouplingLife on Mars) and if they are really successful at the end of their run, they get offered a followup episode (The OfficeChristmas Show) or even a spinoff (Ashes to Ashes). (In America, Lost took advantage of this idea of an end-date, as well as Matthew Weiner and Mad Men.) More shows should announce an end date, and here's why:

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